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Old 1st June 2007, 10:09 PM   #1
Roger Farmer
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Lightbulb How can I brghten part of a JPG image?

I have just downloaded Serif Photoplus 6.03 (the free version) and I am trying to figure out how to use it.

I have a JPG image that is partly underexposed and I want to brighten these parts. I canít easily select the underexposed portions because they are in various parts of the image. I canít brighten the entire image because then the parts that are already OK would be too bright. Also, some parts of the image only need a little brightening while other parts are darker and need more brightening.

Can Photoplus brighten various parts of a JPG image by varying amounts, and if so, how do I do that?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 
Old 2nd June 2007, 01:18 PM   #2
'Awful Punster'
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Lightbulb Re: How can I brghten part of a JPG image?

Roger,

PhotoPlus can indeed brighten various parts of an image by varying amounts. I recommend that you spend a little time becoming familiar with the various tools in PhP6, particularly the selection tools, but here are a few steps to get you started:

1. Choose 'Duplicate' on the Layers menu to create a copy of the image on a new layer.
2. Select as much as you can of the areas you want to brighten the most.
3. Go to 'Layers > Add Mask > Reveal Selection'
4. Using the dropdown on the Layer Manager tab, change the Blend Mode from 'Normal' to 'Screen'. This will brighten the selected areas; using 'Dodge' instead of 'Screen' will produce a more subtle effect.
5. Go to 'Layers > View Mask'.

At this point you will see that the mask is white in the brightened areas and black over the rest of the image. Painting in shades of grey will give you the varying amounts of brightening that you're looking for.

5. Go to 'Layers > View Mask' again, to toggle it off so you can see the image as you work on it.
6. Go to 'Select > Deselect' (or press Ctrl+D) so you can paint without restriction.
7. Go to 'Layers > Edit Mask'. The Color tab will display a Grayscale slider.
8. Choose a mid-grey from the slider on the Color tab.
9. Click the Paintbrush toolbar button and go to the Brush Tip tab to choose a suitable brush.
10. Paint over the areas which were brightened too much at step 4.

HTH, Alfred

Click here for my 'Clickable forum links' page http://serif.awfulpunster.info/ez_li...et='_blank
 
Old 2nd June 2007, 03:12 PM   #3
RichardS ~UK
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Lightbulb A lazier method

Roger,

There's a lazier method, which I only half remember:

- Open the photo in PhP
- Duplicate the layer

-- Change the duplicate to greyscale
-- Change this greyscale layer to negative
-- Blur the negative

- Merge the blurred negative with the original, using "dodge" or "screen" etc.
- Adjust the "opacity" of the blurred negative to give the desired effect.

- Export the result!

Perhaps someone could correct this if it's wrong?

ps. In general, most tutorials written for Photoshop (or Paintshop etc.) can be adapted for use with PhotoPlus. Newer versions of PhP have more, better tools.

Richard
 
Old 2nd June 2007, 03:48 PM   #4
Sixwheels
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Lightbulb Re:*How can I brghten part of a JPG image?

Additionally, you could purchase PhP11 which has the new Shadow/Highlight/Midtone tool for just this problem.

There is a tutorial in the PhP11 help files which discusses several methods of adjusting contrast. One suggests using Unsharp Mask with the proper Amount, Radius, and Threshold settings. I imagine that would be for very subtle changes, though.
 
Old 2nd June 2007, 07:18 PM   #5
RichardS ~UK
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Lightbulb Re: Unsharp Mask

Sixwheels,

The "lazier method" I described was similar to using an "unsharp mask."

As you probably know, the name "unsharp mask" comes from the technique used with film processing where you'd sandwich a blurred copy (ie. the "unsharp mask") alongside the actual negative: Done skilfully, this produced a sharper image.

These days, most of us are confused by the use of these archaic names in our modern software.

Richard
 
Old 3rd June 2007, 01:38 AM   #6
Alison G. Wright
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Lightbulb Re: Unsharp Mask

On:02/06/2007 18:18:07 - RichardS ~UK wrote:
Quote:
These days, most of us are confused by the use of these archaic names in our modern software.
Ahhhh!!! Now that explains a lot - thanks!

You are right that certain 'photographic' terminogy is not exactly explicit, so as obvious as it may seem, it's still worth pointing out meanings to those of us who are still learning!!! Thanks.

Ali
 
Old 3rd June 2007, 04:12 AM   #7
Jim B.
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Lightbulb Re: Unsharp Mask

On:6/3/2007 12:38:28 AM - Alison G. Wright wrote:
Quote:
You are right that certain 'photographic' terminogy is not exactly explicit, so as obvious as it may seem, it's still worth pointing out meanings to those of us who are still learning!!!
By way of illustating the effects of some photographic terminoligy, download and install the free virtualPhotographer http://www.optikvervelabs.com/ plug-in and its add-ons from optikVerve Labs, then have fun playing with it in PhotoPlus.

----------

Jim B. :> )

If you have nothing to say, stop talking.
 
Old 3rd June 2007, 11:32 AM   #8
Alison G. Wright
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Lightbulb Re: Unsharp Mask



Ali
 
Old 3rd June 2007, 02:03 PM   #9
Roger Farmer
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Lightbulb Thanks for all your suggestions !!!

Thanks for all who responded to my original question. I will be trying out your suggestions in the next several days. Thanks again !!
 
Old 3rd June 2007, 02:03 PM   #10
'Awful Punster'
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Lightbulb Re: Unsharp Mask

Richard,
Quote:
The "lazier method" I described was similar to using an "unsharp mask."
In fact, you could be even lazier: you probably don't need your blurring step unless you want a sharper image as well as a brighter one. I'm not absolutely sure, but I think the effect of screening with a copy of the image is to lighten the darker areas more than the lighter ones, so unless you want to tinker locally with the natural result you probably don't need the layer mask in the method I outlined ó just changing the opacity of the screening layer should suffice. In other words, simply adding either a Dodge layer or a Screen layer and tweaking its opacity should produce quite good results.

Alfred
 
Old 3rd June 2007, 03:28 PM   #11
RichardS ~UK
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Lightbulb Some Tutorials

Alfred,

I can't find a copy of the original tutorial: Perhaps it was one that fotofects.com lost in their server crash?

Some web "tutorials" are more reliable than others!

Three relevant Photoshop ones are:

- Contrast Mask]photoshoptutorials.ws/photoshop-tutorials/photo-restoration/digital-flash.html[/url].
- Multiply with Layer Mask]photoshoptutorials.ws/photoshop-tutorials/photo-retouching/multiply-with-layer-mask.html[/url].
- Digital Flash Fill http://www.instructables.com/id/E7JAI5CH63EYF8LZYR/.

Finally, I recommend the free online training courses provided by hp.com and cnet.com. HP's next "Advanced Photoshop CS2" course starts on 7th June, with an excellent instructor(ess).

There are differences, but most of the material can be adapted to PhotoPlus. (Just don't try to ask specific non-Photoshop questions!)

Richard
 
Old 3rd June 2007, 03:51 PM   #12
Sixwheels
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Lightbulb Re: Unsharp Mask

On:6/2/2007 6:18:07 PM - RichardS ~UK wrote:
Quote:
As you probably know, the name "unsharp mask" comes from the technique used with film processing where you'd sandwich a blurred copy (ie. the "unsharp mask") alongside the actual negative: Done skilfully, this produced a sharper image.
Very interesting. Actually, I didn't know that; I try not to know anything if at all possible. Makes life so much easier. ;-)
 
 

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